Coverart for item
The Resource Lies, damned lies, and science : how to sort through the noise around global warming, the latest health claims, and other scientific controversies, Sherry Seethaler

Lies, damned lies, and science : how to sort through the noise around global warming, the latest health claims, and other scientific controversies, Sherry Seethaler

Label
Lies, damned lies, and science : how to sort through the noise around global warming, the latest health claims, and other scientific controversies
Title
Lies, damned lies, and science
Title remainder
how to sort through the noise around global warming, the latest health claims, and other scientific controversies
Statement of responsibility
Sherry Seethaler
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
"Every day, there's a new scientific or health controversy. And every day, it seems as if there's a new study that contradicts what you heard yesterday. What's really going on? Who's telling the truth? Who's faking it? What do scientists actually know - and what don't they know? This book will help cut through the confusion and make sense of it all." "Science educator and journalist Dr. Sherry Seethaler reveals how science and health research really work ... how to put scientific claims in context and understand the real tradeoffs involved ... tell quality research from junk science ... discover when someone's deliberately trying to fool you ... and find more information you can trust." "Seethaler reveals the tricks self-interested players use to mislead and confuse you, and points you to sources of information you can actually rely upon. Her many examples range from genetic engineering of crops to drug treatments for depression."--Jacket
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1970-
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Seethaler, Sherry
Dewey number
500
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
index present
LC call number
Q223
LC item number
.S33 2009
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • bibliography
  • reviews
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Communication in science
  • Information resources
  • Global warming
  • Science news Evaluation
  • Science Decision making
  • Communication in science
  • Global warming
  • Information resources
  • Global warming
Label
Lies, damned lies, and science : how to sort through the noise around global warming, the latest health claims, and other scientific controversies, Sherry Seethaler
Link
http://catdir.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip0824/2008032002.html
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Preface -- Introduction -- 1. Potions, plot, personalities : understand how science progresses and why scientists sometimes disagree -- "The scientific method"--not as easy as pi -- With new tools, researchers can answer new questions--but only after the bugs are worked out -- Models play a critical role in the progress of science -- What's all this talk about controversy? -- Scientific revolutions really happen -- Disputes are not a sign of science gone wrong -- The media often misrepresents disputes between scientists -- From watering hole to prime time--birth and development of an idea -- Scientists rarely work in isolation -- Critique is very important in the publication process -- The scientific review process is not flawless -- 2. Who's who? : identify those who hold stake in an issue and what their positions are -- People, positions, purposes -- Seek out the voices of stakeholders in all categories and unearth the silent voices -- Ask yourself what motivates each stakeholder -- Remember the "broken telephone" effect and consult the original source -- 3. Decisions, decisions : elucidate all the pros and cons of a decision -- From black and white to vibrant technicolor -- Nuance is the norm -- Determine the appropriate scope of the choice and compare to relevant alternatives -- Say "yes" to one and leave the other behind -- Know the themes of risks and benefits that arise in science-related issues -- 4. Compare and contrast : place alternatives in an appropriate context to evaluate tradeoffs -- Context connections -- Compare technologies to other technologies -- Put findings in a geographical context -- Consider the historical context -- Express figures on a comprehensible scale -- Qualify the figures according to the circumstances under which they hold true -- Ask how the numbers being cited compare to "normal" -- Be careful not to be misled by averages -- For comparisons expressed as a percentage, ask "percent of what?" -- Reframe losses as gains or gains as losses -- Determine if there is a context that may explain an observation -- Putting it all together -- Choose the appropriate scope of comparison -- Find the right basis for comparison -- Consider different themes of tradeoffs -- Think about how the implications of a decision may change over time -- Evaluate risks and benefits by placing them in the appropriate contexts
  • 5. What happens if ...? : distinguish between cause and coincidence -- Cause and effect--finding the culprit -- Brainstorm other possible causes -- Recognize that nonexperimental findings such as epidemiological observations have caveats -- Be skeptical of anecdotal evidence -- Understand how combining multiple forms of data can strengthen conclusions -- Recognize that a plausible mechanism is key to linking a cause and an effect -- 6. Specific or general : recognize how broadly the conclusions from a study may be applied -- Individuals : consider whether a result collected in one test population applies to another -- Locale : consider how applicable studies of one community or geographical region are to other locales -- Conditions : consider the possible effects of a change in conditions on experimental findings or their applicability -- Time : consider whether findings would be influenced by time, either the period of history or the duration of the study -- 7. Fun figures : see through the number jumble -- Elucidate hidden confounding factors -- Determine whether the numbers are statistically significant -- Determine whether the numbers are statistically meaningful -- Make sure the statistics apply to the situation -- Watch out for selection bias -- Ask whether a statistical change reflects reality or the way the data were collected -- Putting it all together -- 8. Society's say : discern the relationships between science and policy -- Morals and money--influences on the progress of science -- Coercion and lies -- Ethics and oversight -- Ethics from the inside -- Unintended consequences -- Pride of nations -- Fear of the grim reaper -- Power of the people -- Follow the money -- From scientific results to policy decisions--more morals and money -- One for all -- The precautionary principle -- Costs benefits analysis
  • 9. All the tricks in the book : get past the ploys designed to simply bypass logic -- Quirks of logic -- Failure to think outside the box -- Predisposition to link cause and effect -- Overgeneralization -- Strange ways our minds make sense of statistics -- Getting dragged down by anchors -- Confirmation bias -- Hearts and guts -- Beware of pseudo experts -- Look out for buzzwords and slogans -- Remember the story of "The Emperor's new clothes" -- Claims of ancient wisdom unknown to science should be treated as suspect -- Beware of vague, simple claims -- Claims that there are no disadvantages (or no advantages) should raise hackles -- Use caution when considering attacks by one stakeholder on another -- 10. Fitting the pieces together : know how to seek information to gain a balanced perspective -- Peeling back the layers -- Claims and caveats--case studies -- Case 1 : chemicals, crops, and cancer -- Case 2 : the price of smelling fresh -- Case 3 : stormy future -- Case 4 : discovery of the obesity gene -- Case 5 : clear and current danger -- Case 6 : diet debacle -- Information sleuthing -- Bunk busters -- Like a blood hound -- Checking all the angles -- Conclusion. Conclusion : twenty essential applications to the tools -- Understand how science progresses and why scientists sometimes disagree -- Identify those who hold stake in an issue and what their positions are -- Elucidate all the pros and cons of a decision -- Place alternatives in an appropriate context to evaluate tradeoffs -- Distinguish between cause and coincidence -- Recognize how broadly conclusions from a study may be applied -- See through the number jumble -- Discern the relationships between science and policy -- Get past the ploys designed to simply bypass logic -- Know how to seek information to gain a balanced perspective -- Acknowledgments -- About the author -- Index
Control code
ocn234444690
Dimensions
24 cm
Extent
xxiv, 198 pages
Isbn
9780137155224
Lccn
2008032002
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
illustrations
System control number
  • (Sirsi) o234444690
  • (OCoLC)234444690
Label
Lies, damned lies, and science : how to sort through the noise around global warming, the latest health claims, and other scientific controversies, Sherry Seethaler
Link
http://catdir.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip0824/2008032002.html
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Preface -- Introduction -- 1. Potions, plot, personalities : understand how science progresses and why scientists sometimes disagree -- "The scientific method"--not as easy as pi -- With new tools, researchers can answer new questions--but only after the bugs are worked out -- Models play a critical role in the progress of science -- What's all this talk about controversy? -- Scientific revolutions really happen -- Disputes are not a sign of science gone wrong -- The media often misrepresents disputes between scientists -- From watering hole to prime time--birth and development of an idea -- Scientists rarely work in isolation -- Critique is very important in the publication process -- The scientific review process is not flawless -- 2. Who's who? : identify those who hold stake in an issue and what their positions are -- People, positions, purposes -- Seek out the voices of stakeholders in all categories and unearth the silent voices -- Ask yourself what motivates each stakeholder -- Remember the "broken telephone" effect and consult the original source -- 3. Decisions, decisions : elucidate all the pros and cons of a decision -- From black and white to vibrant technicolor -- Nuance is the norm -- Determine the appropriate scope of the choice and compare to relevant alternatives -- Say "yes" to one and leave the other behind -- Know the themes of risks and benefits that arise in science-related issues -- 4. Compare and contrast : place alternatives in an appropriate context to evaluate tradeoffs -- Context connections -- Compare technologies to other technologies -- Put findings in a geographical context -- Consider the historical context -- Express figures on a comprehensible scale -- Qualify the figures according to the circumstances under which they hold true -- Ask how the numbers being cited compare to "normal" -- Be careful not to be misled by averages -- For comparisons expressed as a percentage, ask "percent of what?" -- Reframe losses as gains or gains as losses -- Determine if there is a context that may explain an observation -- Putting it all together -- Choose the appropriate scope of comparison -- Find the right basis for comparison -- Consider different themes of tradeoffs -- Think about how the implications of a decision may change over time -- Evaluate risks and benefits by placing them in the appropriate contexts
  • 5. What happens if ...? : distinguish between cause and coincidence -- Cause and effect--finding the culprit -- Brainstorm other possible causes -- Recognize that nonexperimental findings such as epidemiological observations have caveats -- Be skeptical of anecdotal evidence -- Understand how combining multiple forms of data can strengthen conclusions -- Recognize that a plausible mechanism is key to linking a cause and an effect -- 6. Specific or general : recognize how broadly the conclusions from a study may be applied -- Individuals : consider whether a result collected in one test population applies to another -- Locale : consider how applicable studies of one community or geographical region are to other locales -- Conditions : consider the possible effects of a change in conditions on experimental findings or their applicability -- Time : consider whether findings would be influenced by time, either the period of history or the duration of the study -- 7. Fun figures : see through the number jumble -- Elucidate hidden confounding factors -- Determine whether the numbers are statistically significant -- Determine whether the numbers are statistically meaningful -- Make sure the statistics apply to the situation -- Watch out for selection bias -- Ask whether a statistical change reflects reality or the way the data were collected -- Putting it all together -- 8. Society's say : discern the relationships between science and policy -- Morals and money--influences on the progress of science -- Coercion and lies -- Ethics and oversight -- Ethics from the inside -- Unintended consequences -- Pride of nations -- Fear of the grim reaper -- Power of the people -- Follow the money -- From scientific results to policy decisions--more morals and money -- One for all -- The precautionary principle -- Costs benefits analysis
  • 9. All the tricks in the book : get past the ploys designed to simply bypass logic -- Quirks of logic -- Failure to think outside the box -- Predisposition to link cause and effect -- Overgeneralization -- Strange ways our minds make sense of statistics -- Getting dragged down by anchors -- Confirmation bias -- Hearts and guts -- Beware of pseudo experts -- Look out for buzzwords and slogans -- Remember the story of "The Emperor's new clothes" -- Claims of ancient wisdom unknown to science should be treated as suspect -- Beware of vague, simple claims -- Claims that there are no disadvantages (or no advantages) should raise hackles -- Use caution when considering attacks by one stakeholder on another -- 10. Fitting the pieces together : know how to seek information to gain a balanced perspective -- Peeling back the layers -- Claims and caveats--case studies -- Case 1 : chemicals, crops, and cancer -- Case 2 : the price of smelling fresh -- Case 3 : stormy future -- Case 4 : discovery of the obesity gene -- Case 5 : clear and current danger -- Case 6 : diet debacle -- Information sleuthing -- Bunk busters -- Like a blood hound -- Checking all the angles -- Conclusion. Conclusion : twenty essential applications to the tools -- Understand how science progresses and why scientists sometimes disagree -- Identify those who hold stake in an issue and what their positions are -- Elucidate all the pros and cons of a decision -- Place alternatives in an appropriate context to evaluate tradeoffs -- Distinguish between cause and coincidence -- Recognize how broadly conclusions from a study may be applied -- See through the number jumble -- Discern the relationships between science and policy -- Get past the ploys designed to simply bypass logic -- Know how to seek information to gain a balanced perspective -- Acknowledgments -- About the author -- Index
Control code
ocn234444690
Dimensions
24 cm
Extent
xxiv, 198 pages
Isbn
9780137155224
Lccn
2008032002
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
illustrations
System control number
  • (Sirsi) o234444690
  • (OCoLC)234444690

Library Locations

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