Coverart for item
The Resource How do we tell the workers? : the socioeconomic foundations of work and vocational education, Joe L. Kincheloe

How do we tell the workers? : the socioeconomic foundations of work and vocational education, Joe L. Kincheloe

Label
How do we tell the workers? : the socioeconomic foundations of work and vocational education
Title
How do we tell the workers?
Title remainder
the socioeconomic foundations of work and vocational education
Statement of responsibility
Joe L. Kincheloe
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Kincheloe, Joe L
Dewey number
370.11/3
Index
index present
LC call number
LC1045
LC item number
.K545 1999
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Vocational education
  • Vocational education
  • Work
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Enseignement professionnel
  • Enseignement professionnel
  • Pédagogie critique
  • Travail
  • Enseignement professionnel
  • Enseignement professionnel
  • Travail
  • Pédagogie critique
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Vocational education
  • Vocational education
  • Work
  • United States
  • Beroepsonderwijs
  • Sociaal-economische aspecten
  • Arbeit
  • Arbeitswelt
  • Berufsbildung
  • Soziales System
  • Wirtschaftssystem
  • USA
  • USA
Label
How do we tell the workers? : the socioeconomic foundations of work and vocational education, Joe L. Kincheloe
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 421-436) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • 11
  • The Smith-Hughes Act: Consolidating the Victory of the Business Efficiency Progressives
  • 124
  • Savoring the Victory: The Post-Smith-Hughes Era
  • 126
  • Repressed Memory: The Lost History of Radical Vocational Education
  • 129
  • Moving Toward Midcentury: The Russell Report, World War II, and Life Adjustment Education
  • 131
  • The 1960s and 1970s: Deja Vu All Over Again
  • 133
  • Vocation, Identity, and a Sense of Ethics
  • 7
  • Failures and Reforms: The Recent History of Vocational Education
  • 138
  • American Vocational Education -- a Failure?
  • 138
  • The Debate over Educational Reform in the 1980s
  • 141
  • The New Era: President Clinton and Goals 2000
  • 145
  • The Revealing Debate over National Skills Standards
  • 14
  • 145
  • The Great Conflict: Changing Vocational Education to Meet Contemporary Demands for Smart Workers
  • 148
  • The Value of the Perkins Act
  • 149
  • The Effort to Improve the Transition from School to Work
  • 150
  • Impediments to Contemporary Vocational Education Reform
  • 153
  • Part 3
  • Work and Democracy: Producing Meaning in Authoritarian Workplaces
  • Coping with and Directing Change
  • 8
  • Post-Fordism and Technopower: The Changing Economic and Political Arena
  • 157
  • Work and the Rise of Post-Fordism
  • 158
  • Taylor in Disguise
  • 161
  • Technopower
  • 162
  • 15
  • Technopower, Knowledge Control, and Democracy
  • 163
  • Rage and Apathy: The Subtle Workings of Technopower, the Politics of Corporatism
  • 167
  • The Growing Gulf Between Core and Peripheral Workers in Post-Fordism
  • 171
  • 9
  • Democratic Post-Fordist Workplaces and Debating the Changing Purposes of Vocational Education
  • 173
  • The Language of Possibility: The Democratic Post-Fordist Workplaces
  • Shaping the Nature of Vocational Education: The Social and Political Role of Work
  • 173
  • The Never-ending Debate: Vocational Training Versus Vocational Education
  • 175
  • Rethinking the Five Traditional Emphases of Vocational Education
  • 176
  • Rehm on the Three Dominant Views Concerning Vocational Education
  • 179
  • The Fourth Perspective: Vocational Education for Jobs and Justice
  • 183
  • Economic Citizenship
  • 16
  • 186
  • Understanding Craft, Making Meaning
  • 188
  • The Ramifications of Knowing
  • 190
  • Students and Workers as Learners
  • 192
  • 10
  • Confronting and Rethinking Educational Theory: Critical Vocational Pedagogy and Workers as Researchers
  • 196
  • Challenging Taken-for-granted Assumptions
  • Grounding Critical Theory
  • 197
  • A Critical Pedagogy of Vocational Education and the Politics of Skepticism
  • 198
  • Habitus, Popular Culture, and Identity
  • 199
  • Critical Pedagogy and Worker Empowerment
  • 201
  • Critical Pedagogy and the Community of Workers
  • 203
  • 19
  • Workers as Critical Researchers
  • 206
  • Rethinking Vocational Pedagogy in Light of Critical Worker Research
  • 212
  • Part 4
  • Race, Class, and Gender
  • 11
  • Plausible Deniability: The Skeleton in Vocational Education's Closet
  • 217
  • You Study Vocational Education, You Study the Marginalized
  • 2
  • 217
  • "Shhh ..
  • Part 1
  • Modernism and the Evolution of the Technocratic Mind
  • 23
  • The Birth of Modernism
  • 23
  • The Epistemology of Positivism
  • 25
  • Modernism and the Technical Fix
  • 32
  • Modernist Fragmentation and the Embrace of Short-term Goals
  • 34
  • The Nature of Work
  • Centralization, Bureaucratization, and Modernist Experts on the Loose
  • 36
  • Modernist Breakdown of Community and Public Space
  • 37
  • Irrational Production and Ecological Destruction
  • 39
  • Efficiency, Rationalization, and Decontextualization
  • 40
  • 3
  • Power and the Development of the Modernist Economy
  • 1
  • 43
  • The Organization of Work in Relation to Power
  • 43
  • The Power of Corporations: Subverting the Ethnic of Democracy
  • 44
  • Cultivating Inequality: The Widening Chasm Between Workers and Management
  • 49
  • Mystifying Power: Control in the Name of Democracy
  • 53
  • Sophisticating Power: The Development of Scientific Management
  • A Sense of Purpose
  • 55
  • The Consummation of the Modernist Economy: The Rise of Fordism
  • 59
  • The Breaking Point: The Decline of Fordism
  • 62
  • 4
  • Good Work, Bad Work, and the Debate over Ethical Labor
  • 64
  • Workplace Democracy
  • 64
  • 3
  • Good Work and the Struggle for Worker Dignity
  • 65
  • Identifying and Subverting Bad Work
  • 70
  • Debating Work Ethnics and Economic Policy: The Rise of the New Right
  • 74
  • Adam Smith, the Sequel: The Emergence of Neoclassical Economics
  • 78
  • Automation and the Future of Good Work
  • 81
  • The Threat and the Vision
  • The Buck Stops over There: Reshaping the Workplace
  • 87
  • Developing a Vocational Education That Challenges Bad Work
  • 89
  • Part 2
  • The Historical Dimensions of Vocational Education
  • 5
  • The Origins of Vocational Education
  • 93
  • The Forgotten Context: The Impact of Industrialization
  • 5
  • 93
  • Education for Economic Development
  • 97
  • Vocational Education: Manual Training
  • 99
  • Industrial Education for African Americans
  • 102
  • Expanding Secondary Schooling and the Quest for Social Order and Americanization
  • 106
  • Missing the Point: Traditional Interpretations and the Quest for Order
  • "We Don't Get No Respect": Workers and Vocational Education
  • 110
  • 6
  • The Progressive Debate, the Victory of Vocationalism, and the Institutionalization of Schooling for Work
  • 114
  • The Scientifically Managed Workplace Versus the Dignity of Labor
  • 114
  • The Emergence of Conflicting Factions of Progressive Educators
  • 116
  • Justifying Vocational Education: Producing the Workers Industry Wants
  • 122
  • The Wages of Hopelessness
  • Democratic Unionism in the Global Economy and Corporate-Directed Vocational Education
  • 323
  • Listening to Labor
  • 323
  • A Critical Unionism?
  • 325
  • Keeping Unions Out of Vocational Education
  • 327
  • Justifying Unionism in Vocational Education
  • 327
  • 228
  • A Brief Overview of Recent Union History
  • 330
  • Self-Inflicted Wounds: The Failure of American Labor
  • 333
  • Crumbling Support for Labor: The Need for Unions in the Post-Fordist Economy
  • 336
  • Globalization's Threat to Unionism: Corporate Infidelity
  • 339
  • 16
  • The New Unionism and the Struggle for a Democratic Social Movement
  • Confusing Refusal with Inability: The Costs of Resistance
  • 343
  • Vocational Education as Diversionary Tactic: Battle Plans of Class Warfare
  • 343
  • The Emergence of a New Labor Movement in the 1990s
  • 345
  • New Labor Strategies
  • 350
  • Critical Networking: Constructing the Labor Curriculum
  • 357
  • Integrating Vocational Education, the New Unionism, and the Global Economy's Declining Need for Workers
  • 231
  • 361
  • Vocational Education and Critical Unionism's Push for Industrial Democracy
  • 363
  • Part 6
  • A Vision of Government, Vocational Education, and the Future
  • 17
  • Worker Civics: The Decline of the Nation-State and the Rise of Corporate Government
  • 367
  • A Critical Vision of Government
  • 367
  • Understanding the Oppositional Identity: The Marginalized Student as Defiant Individual
  • Creative Responses: A New Politics for a New Era
  • 371
  • The Decline of Government and the Realm of the Political: The Breakdown of Democracy
  • 373
  • Bypassing Traditional Political Institutions
  • 375
  • The Emergence of Corporate Government
  • 378
  • Surrendering Public Government: The Debasement of Republicans and Democrats
  • 380
  • 233
  • The Adult World's Dismissal: Marginalized Kids as Aliens
  • 235
  • 12
  • A Touch of Class
  • We Don't Talk About Race and Class in Our Vocational Program": Tracking as Resegregation
  • 237
  • Class Blindness in America
  • 237
  • Relating Class Polarity to the Vision of Vocational Education
  • 240
  • The Conservative Position: Individualistic Blame
  • 241
  • Responding to the New Consensus: Truth Versus Myth
  • 243
  • Separating Difference from Deficiency: The Poor, Not the Stupid
  • 218
  • 245
  • Rethinking Intelligence
  • 246
  • A Brief Description of Postformal Thinking
  • 249
  • The Irrelevance of Individualistic Blame: The Extreme Difficulty of Escaping the Class Barrier
  • 252
  • Controlling the Poor: Inferiority as Self-Image
  • 256
  • Developing the Economic Empowerment Curriculum
  • Becoming a Successful Worker -- and Justice for All
  • 259
  • 13
  • Accounting for Gender
  • 262
  • Connecting Gender with Race and Class: Mainstream Perspectives
  • 263
  • Understanding Gender in Relation to Class and Race
  • 264
  • The Feminization of Poverty
  • 267
  • 221
  • Keeping Women in Their Place: The Nature of Patriarchy
  • 269
  • Patriarchy's Women: The Ideology of Domesticity and the Culture of Romance
  • 272
  • Patriarchy on the Job: Institutional Gender Bias in the Workplace
  • 275
  • Patriarchy on Parade: Men's Workplace Culture
  • 276
  • Patriarchal Dynamics: The Sexual Identity of Women
  • 278
  • Desperately Seeking Mobility
  • Drawing upon Women's Subjugated Knowledge to Fight Patriarchy
  • 280
  • Struggling Against Patriarchy: What Women Want in Their Vocational Life
  • 282
  • Developing a National Economic Program for Economic Justice for Women
  • 285
  • Patriarchy Fights Back
  • 287
  • 14
  • Howlin' Wolf at the Door: Race, Racism, and Vocational Education
  • 226
  • 288
  • Essentialist Racism
  • 289
  • "Institutional Racism," or Alleged Nonpersonal, Structural Racism
  • 292
  • Undermining Dualisms: The Complex Nature of Different Forms of Racism
  • 296
  • The Mutating Virus: Post-Fordist Racism
  • 297
  • Gresson's Recovery of White Supremacy: Whites as Victims
  • The Double Disadvantage of Black Women
  • 298
  • The Andromeda Strain: The Contemporary Mutation, Crypto-Racism
  • 300
  • The Lived Consequences of Racism: Disparity in Black and White
  • 308
  • Governmental Neglect: The Politics of Discrimination
  • 310
  • The Wolf at the Door: Structural Impediments to Minority Mobility
  • 311
  • The Collapse of the Inner City: Hyper-ghettoization
  • 227
  • 314
  • Whiteness as Racial Identity
  • 316
  • Focusing on White Privilege
  • 317
  • Fighting Racism: The Role of Vocational Teachers and Students
  • 319
  • Part 5
  • The Role of Labor and Unions in Vocational Education
  • 15
Control code
ocm38304560
Dimensions
24 cm
Extent
xiii, 450 pages
Isbn
9780813387369
Lccn
98011325
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
System control number
  • (Sirsi) o38304560
  • (OCoLC)38304560
Label
How do we tell the workers? : the socioeconomic foundations of work and vocational education, Joe L. Kincheloe
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 421-436) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • 11
  • The Smith-Hughes Act: Consolidating the Victory of the Business Efficiency Progressives
  • 124
  • Savoring the Victory: The Post-Smith-Hughes Era
  • 126
  • Repressed Memory: The Lost History of Radical Vocational Education
  • 129
  • Moving Toward Midcentury: The Russell Report, World War II, and Life Adjustment Education
  • 131
  • The 1960s and 1970s: Deja Vu All Over Again
  • 133
  • Vocation, Identity, and a Sense of Ethics
  • 7
  • Failures and Reforms: The Recent History of Vocational Education
  • 138
  • American Vocational Education -- a Failure?
  • 138
  • The Debate over Educational Reform in the 1980s
  • 141
  • The New Era: President Clinton and Goals 2000
  • 145
  • The Revealing Debate over National Skills Standards
  • 14
  • 145
  • The Great Conflict: Changing Vocational Education to Meet Contemporary Demands for Smart Workers
  • 148
  • The Value of the Perkins Act
  • 149
  • The Effort to Improve the Transition from School to Work
  • 150
  • Impediments to Contemporary Vocational Education Reform
  • 153
  • Part 3
  • Work and Democracy: Producing Meaning in Authoritarian Workplaces
  • Coping with and Directing Change
  • 8
  • Post-Fordism and Technopower: The Changing Economic and Political Arena
  • 157
  • Work and the Rise of Post-Fordism
  • 158
  • Taylor in Disguise
  • 161
  • Technopower
  • 162
  • 15
  • Technopower, Knowledge Control, and Democracy
  • 163
  • Rage and Apathy: The Subtle Workings of Technopower, the Politics of Corporatism
  • 167
  • The Growing Gulf Between Core and Peripheral Workers in Post-Fordism
  • 171
  • 9
  • Democratic Post-Fordist Workplaces and Debating the Changing Purposes of Vocational Education
  • 173
  • The Language of Possibility: The Democratic Post-Fordist Workplaces
  • Shaping the Nature of Vocational Education: The Social and Political Role of Work
  • 173
  • The Never-ending Debate: Vocational Training Versus Vocational Education
  • 175
  • Rethinking the Five Traditional Emphases of Vocational Education
  • 176
  • Rehm on the Three Dominant Views Concerning Vocational Education
  • 179
  • The Fourth Perspective: Vocational Education for Jobs and Justice
  • 183
  • Economic Citizenship
  • 16
  • 186
  • Understanding Craft, Making Meaning
  • 188
  • The Ramifications of Knowing
  • 190
  • Students and Workers as Learners
  • 192
  • 10
  • Confronting and Rethinking Educational Theory: Critical Vocational Pedagogy and Workers as Researchers
  • 196
  • Challenging Taken-for-granted Assumptions
  • Grounding Critical Theory
  • 197
  • A Critical Pedagogy of Vocational Education and the Politics of Skepticism
  • 198
  • Habitus, Popular Culture, and Identity
  • 199
  • Critical Pedagogy and Worker Empowerment
  • 201
  • Critical Pedagogy and the Community of Workers
  • 203
  • 19
  • Workers as Critical Researchers
  • 206
  • Rethinking Vocational Pedagogy in Light of Critical Worker Research
  • 212
  • Part 4
  • Race, Class, and Gender
  • 11
  • Plausible Deniability: The Skeleton in Vocational Education's Closet
  • 217
  • You Study Vocational Education, You Study the Marginalized
  • 2
  • 217
  • "Shhh ..
  • Part 1
  • Modernism and the Evolution of the Technocratic Mind
  • 23
  • The Birth of Modernism
  • 23
  • The Epistemology of Positivism
  • 25
  • Modernism and the Technical Fix
  • 32
  • Modernist Fragmentation and the Embrace of Short-term Goals
  • 34
  • The Nature of Work
  • Centralization, Bureaucratization, and Modernist Experts on the Loose
  • 36
  • Modernist Breakdown of Community and Public Space
  • 37
  • Irrational Production and Ecological Destruction
  • 39
  • Efficiency, Rationalization, and Decontextualization
  • 40
  • 3
  • Power and the Development of the Modernist Economy
  • 1
  • 43
  • The Organization of Work in Relation to Power
  • 43
  • The Power of Corporations: Subverting the Ethnic of Democracy
  • 44
  • Cultivating Inequality: The Widening Chasm Between Workers and Management
  • 49
  • Mystifying Power: Control in the Name of Democracy
  • 53
  • Sophisticating Power: The Development of Scientific Management
  • A Sense of Purpose
  • 55
  • The Consummation of the Modernist Economy: The Rise of Fordism
  • 59
  • The Breaking Point: The Decline of Fordism
  • 62
  • 4
  • Good Work, Bad Work, and the Debate over Ethical Labor
  • 64
  • Workplace Democracy
  • 64
  • 3
  • Good Work and the Struggle for Worker Dignity
  • 65
  • Identifying and Subverting Bad Work
  • 70
  • Debating Work Ethnics and Economic Policy: The Rise of the New Right
  • 74
  • Adam Smith, the Sequel: The Emergence of Neoclassical Economics
  • 78
  • Automation and the Future of Good Work
  • 81
  • The Threat and the Vision
  • The Buck Stops over There: Reshaping the Workplace
  • 87
  • Developing a Vocational Education That Challenges Bad Work
  • 89
  • Part 2
  • The Historical Dimensions of Vocational Education
  • 5
  • The Origins of Vocational Education
  • 93
  • The Forgotten Context: The Impact of Industrialization
  • 5
  • 93
  • Education for Economic Development
  • 97
  • Vocational Education: Manual Training
  • 99
  • Industrial Education for African Americans
  • 102
  • Expanding Secondary Schooling and the Quest for Social Order and Americanization
  • 106
  • Missing the Point: Traditional Interpretations and the Quest for Order
  • "We Don't Get No Respect": Workers and Vocational Education
  • 110
  • 6
  • The Progressive Debate, the Victory of Vocationalism, and the Institutionalization of Schooling for Work
  • 114
  • The Scientifically Managed Workplace Versus the Dignity of Labor
  • 114
  • The Emergence of Conflicting Factions of Progressive Educators
  • 116
  • Justifying Vocational Education: Producing the Workers Industry Wants
  • 122
  • The Wages of Hopelessness
  • Democratic Unionism in the Global Economy and Corporate-Directed Vocational Education
  • 323
  • Listening to Labor
  • 323
  • A Critical Unionism?
  • 325
  • Keeping Unions Out of Vocational Education
  • 327
  • Justifying Unionism in Vocational Education
  • 327
  • 228
  • A Brief Overview of Recent Union History
  • 330
  • Self-Inflicted Wounds: The Failure of American Labor
  • 333
  • Crumbling Support for Labor: The Need for Unions in the Post-Fordist Economy
  • 336
  • Globalization's Threat to Unionism: Corporate Infidelity
  • 339
  • 16
  • The New Unionism and the Struggle for a Democratic Social Movement
  • Confusing Refusal with Inability: The Costs of Resistance
  • 343
  • Vocational Education as Diversionary Tactic: Battle Plans of Class Warfare
  • 343
  • The Emergence of a New Labor Movement in the 1990s
  • 345
  • New Labor Strategies
  • 350
  • Critical Networking: Constructing the Labor Curriculum
  • 357
  • Integrating Vocational Education, the New Unionism, and the Global Economy's Declining Need for Workers
  • 231
  • 361
  • Vocational Education and Critical Unionism's Push for Industrial Democracy
  • 363
  • Part 6
  • A Vision of Government, Vocational Education, and the Future
  • 17
  • Worker Civics: The Decline of the Nation-State and the Rise of Corporate Government
  • 367
  • A Critical Vision of Government
  • 367
  • Understanding the Oppositional Identity: The Marginalized Student as Defiant Individual
  • Creative Responses: A New Politics for a New Era
  • 371
  • The Decline of Government and the Realm of the Political: The Breakdown of Democracy
  • 373
  • Bypassing Traditional Political Institutions
  • 375
  • The Emergence of Corporate Government
  • 378
  • Surrendering Public Government: The Debasement of Republicans and Democrats
  • 380
  • 233
  • The Adult World's Dismissal: Marginalized Kids as Aliens
  • 235
  • 12
  • A Touch of Class
  • We Don't Talk About Race and Class in Our Vocational Program": Tracking as Resegregation
  • 237
  • Class Blindness in America
  • 237
  • Relating Class Polarity to the Vision of Vocational Education
  • 240
  • The Conservative Position: Individualistic Blame
  • 241
  • Responding to the New Consensus: Truth Versus Myth
  • 243
  • Separating Difference from Deficiency: The Poor, Not the Stupid
  • 218
  • 245
  • Rethinking Intelligence
  • 246
  • A Brief Description of Postformal Thinking
  • 249
  • The Irrelevance of Individualistic Blame: The Extreme Difficulty of Escaping the Class Barrier
  • 252
  • Controlling the Poor: Inferiority as Self-Image
  • 256
  • Developing the Economic Empowerment Curriculum
  • Becoming a Successful Worker -- and Justice for All
  • 259
  • 13
  • Accounting for Gender
  • 262
  • Connecting Gender with Race and Class: Mainstream Perspectives
  • 263
  • Understanding Gender in Relation to Class and Race
  • 264
  • The Feminization of Poverty
  • 267
  • 221
  • Keeping Women in Their Place: The Nature of Patriarchy
  • 269
  • Patriarchy's Women: The Ideology of Domesticity and the Culture of Romance
  • 272
  • Patriarchy on the Job: Institutional Gender Bias in the Workplace
  • 275
  • Patriarchy on Parade: Men's Workplace Culture
  • 276
  • Patriarchal Dynamics: The Sexual Identity of Women
  • 278
  • Desperately Seeking Mobility
  • Drawing upon Women's Subjugated Knowledge to Fight Patriarchy
  • 280
  • Struggling Against Patriarchy: What Women Want in Their Vocational Life
  • 282
  • Developing a National Economic Program for Economic Justice for Women
  • 285
  • Patriarchy Fights Back
  • 287
  • 14
  • Howlin' Wolf at the Door: Race, Racism, and Vocational Education
  • 226
  • 288
  • Essentialist Racism
  • 289
  • "Institutional Racism," or Alleged Nonpersonal, Structural Racism
  • 292
  • Undermining Dualisms: The Complex Nature of Different Forms of Racism
  • 296
  • The Mutating Virus: Post-Fordist Racism
  • 297
  • Gresson's Recovery of White Supremacy: Whites as Victims
  • The Double Disadvantage of Black Women
  • 298
  • The Andromeda Strain: The Contemporary Mutation, Crypto-Racism
  • 300
  • The Lived Consequences of Racism: Disparity in Black and White
  • 308
  • Governmental Neglect: The Politics of Discrimination
  • 310
  • The Wolf at the Door: Structural Impediments to Minority Mobility
  • 311
  • The Collapse of the Inner City: Hyper-ghettoization
  • 227
  • 314
  • Whiteness as Racial Identity
  • 316
  • Focusing on White Privilege
  • 317
  • Fighting Racism: The Role of Vocational Teachers and Students
  • 319
  • Part 5
  • The Role of Labor and Unions in Vocational Education
  • 15
Control code
ocm38304560
Dimensions
24 cm
Extent
xiii, 450 pages
Isbn
9780813387369
Lccn
98011325
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
System control number
  • (Sirsi) o38304560
  • (OCoLC)38304560

Library Locations

    • Waubonsee: Sugar Grove Campus - Todd LibraryBorrow it
      Collins Hall 2nd Floor Waubonsee Community College Route 47 at Waubonsee Drive, Sugar Grove, IL, 60554-9454, US
      41.7974 -88.45785
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