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The Resource Censored books : critical viewpoints, edited by Nicholas J. Karolides, Lee Burress, John M. Kean

Censored books : critical viewpoints, edited by Nicholas J. Karolides, Lee Burress, John M. Kean

Label
Censored books : critical viewpoints
Title
Censored books
Title remainder
critical viewpoints
Statement of responsibility
edited by Nicholas J. Karolides, Lee Burress, John M. Kean
Contributor
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
A collection of essays confronting the censorship issue, including six authors' views and defenses of individual books
Cataloging source
DLC
Dewey number
810.9
Index
no index present
LC call number
  • PS65.C46
  • PR65 .C46 C46
LC item number
C46 1993
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
  • Karolides, Nicholas J
  • Burress, Lee
  • Kean, John M
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • American literature
  • American literature
  • Censorship
  • American literature
  • Young adult literature, American
  • Children's literature, American
  • Young adult literature, American
  • Children's literature, American
  • Children
  • Youth
  • American literature
  • Letterkunde
  • Censuur
  • Amerikaans
  • American literature
  • American literature
  • American literature
  • Censorship
  • Children
  • Children's literature, American
  • Children's literature, American
  • Young adult literature, American
  • Young adult literature, American
  • Youth
  • United States
Label
Censored books : critical viewpoints, edited by Nicholas J. Karolides, Lee Burress, John M. Kean
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • On censorship
  • Jim Mulvey
  • 31.
  • Flowers for Algernon by Daniel Keyes
  • Robert Small, Jr.
  • 32.
  • "If we cannot trust ...": the pertinence of Judy Blume's Forever
  • Frank Battaglia
  • 33.
  • "Whatsoever things are pure ...": a case for Go Ask Alice
  • Jean P. Rumsey
  • Arthur Miller
  • 34.
  • An apologia for Pearl Buck's The Good Earth
  • Imogene DeSmet
  • 35.
  • The Grapes of Wrath: preserving its place in the curriculum
  • Lee Burress
  • 36.
  • A Hero Ain't Nothin' But a Sandwich: a rationale for classroom use
  • Frank Zidonis
  • 37.
  • 2.
  • If Beale Street Could Talk: a rationale for classroom use
  • William G. McBride
  • 38.
  • Maya Angelou is three writers: I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings
  • James Bertolino
  • 39.
  • Learning to live: when the bird breaks from the cage
  • Opal Moore
  • 40.
  • The stop of truth: In the Night Kitchen
  • Blackballing
  • Paula Fox
  • 41.
  • It's OK If You Don't Love Me: evaluating anticipated experiences of readers
  • Nicholas J. Karolides
  • 42.
  • Johnny Got His Gun: a depression era classic
  • James DeMuth
  • 43.
  • Julie of the Wolves by Jean Craighead George
  • Geneva T. Van Horne
  • John A. Williams
  • 44.
  • Gordon Parks' The Learning Tree: autobiography and education
  • Gilbert Powell Findlay
  • 45.
  • Teaching rationale for William Golding's Lord of the Flies
  • Paul Slayton
  • 46.
  • Shirley Jackson's "The Lottery"
  • Jack Stark
  • 47.
  • 3.
  • Manchild in a world where you just might make it: Claude Brown's Manchild in the Promised Land
  • Sue Bridwell Beckham
  • 48.
  • Reflections on "The Shylock Problem"
  • Gladys V. Veidemanis
  • 49.
  • Supporting traditional values: My Darling, My Hamburger
  • Lee Burress
  • 50.
  • Why Nineteen Eighty-Four should be read and taught
  • Not laughable, but lethal
  • James E. Davis
  • 51.
  • A teachable good book: Of Mice and Men
  • Thomas Scarseth
  • 52.
  • One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich by Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn
  • Frederik Pohl
  • 53.
  • Moby Dick vs. Big Nurse: a feminist defense of a misogynist text: One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest
  • Laura Quinn
  • Norma Fox Mazer
  • 54.
  • Threshold literature: a discussion of Ordinary People
  • Roll Neuhaus
  • 55.
  • In defense of Our Bodies, Ourselves
  • Alleen Pace Nilsen
  • 56.
  • A look inside a landmark: The Outsiders
  • John S. Simmons
  • 57.
  • 4.
  • Is Run, Shelley, Run worth fighting for?
  • Gloria Treadwell Pipkin
  • 58.
  • Penance and repentance in The Scarlet Letter
  • Richard Gappa
  • 59.
  • A rationale for reading John Knowles' A Separate Peace
  • David G. Holborn
  • 60.
  • Authenticity and relevance: Kurt Vonnegut's Slaughterhouse-Five
  • Take the tortillas out of your poetry
  • Peter J. Reed
  • 61.
  • Censoring Judy Blume and Then Again, Maybe I Won't
  • Mel Krutz
  • 62.
  • In defense of To Kill a Mockingbird
  • Jill May
  • 63.
  • Finding humor and value in Where the Sidewalk Ends and A Light in the Attic
  • John M. Kean
  • Introduction
  • Rudolfo A. Anaya
  • 5.
  • White-outs and black-outs on the book shelves
  • Mary Stolz
  • 6.
  • "Shut not your doors": an author looks at censorship
  • Lee Bennett Hopkins
  • II.
  • Challenging books
  • 7.
  • Lee Burress, Nicholas J. Karolides and John M. Kean
  • A rationale for teaching Huckleberry Finn
  • John M. Kean
  • 8.
  • The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn: review of historical challenges
  • Arlene Harris Mitchell
  • 9.
  • Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl
  • Katherine Paterson
  • 10.
  • Annie on My Mind by Nancy Garden
  • Prologue:
  • William Sleator
  • 11.
  • In defense of: Are You There God? It's Me, Margaret, Deenie, and Blubber--three novels by Judy Blume
  • Robin F. Brancato
  • 12.
  • The Bible: source of great literature and controversy
  • Edward B. Jenkinson
  • 13.
  • The Bible and the Constitution
  • Robert M. O'Neil
  • How to be obscene
  • 14.
  • Black Boy (American Hunger): freedom to remember
  • Maryemma Graham and Jerry W. Ward Jr.
  • 15.
  • Black Like Me: in defense of a racial reality
  • Walter C. Farrell, Jr.
  • 16.
  • Bless the Beasts and Children by Glendon Swarthout
  • Sue Ellen Bridgers
  • 17.
  • Upton Sinclair
  • The relevance of Brave New World
  • Robert M. Adams
  • 18.
  • Huxley's Brave New World as social irritant: ban it or buy it?
  • Richard H. Beckham
  • 19.
  • "Alas, alas, that ever love was sin!": marriages moral and immoral in Chaucer
  • Margaret Odegard
  • 20.
  • If you want to know the truth... : The Catcher in the Rye
  • I.
  • Norbert Blei
  • 21.
  • Fighting words in and over Catch-22
  • Marshall Toman
  • 22.
  • "They tell you to do your own thing, but they don't mean it.": censorship and The Chocolate War
  • Zibby Oneal
  • 23.
  • Anthony Burgess's A Clockwork Orange
  • Douglas A. Pearson, Jr.
  • Perspectives: censorship by omission and commission
  • 24.
  • She's just too womanish for them: Alice Walker and The Color Purple
  • Angelene Jamison-Hall
  • 25.
  • Fueling the fire of hell: a reply to censors of The Crucible
  • Joan DelFattore
  • 26.
  • Death of a Salesman: an American classic
  • Harry Harder
  • 27.
  • 1.
  • The debate in literary consciousness: Dickey's Deliverance
  • Robert Beck
  • 28.
  • "Messing up the minds of the citizenry en route": essential questions of value in The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test
  • Terry Beck
  • 29.
  • A Farewell to Arms
  • James A. Michener
  • 30.
  • A defense of A Farewell to Arms
Control code
ocm27430018
Dimensions
23 cm
Extent
xxvi, 498 pages
Isbn
9780810826670
Lccn
93000349
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
System control number
  • (Sirsi) o27430018
  • (OCoLC)27430018
Label
Censored books : critical viewpoints, edited by Nicholas J. Karolides, Lee Burress, John M. Kean
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • On censorship
  • Jim Mulvey
  • 31.
  • Flowers for Algernon by Daniel Keyes
  • Robert Small, Jr.
  • 32.
  • "If we cannot trust ...": the pertinence of Judy Blume's Forever
  • Frank Battaglia
  • 33.
  • "Whatsoever things are pure ...": a case for Go Ask Alice
  • Jean P. Rumsey
  • Arthur Miller
  • 34.
  • An apologia for Pearl Buck's The Good Earth
  • Imogene DeSmet
  • 35.
  • The Grapes of Wrath: preserving its place in the curriculum
  • Lee Burress
  • 36.
  • A Hero Ain't Nothin' But a Sandwich: a rationale for classroom use
  • Frank Zidonis
  • 37.
  • 2.
  • If Beale Street Could Talk: a rationale for classroom use
  • William G. McBride
  • 38.
  • Maya Angelou is three writers: I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings
  • James Bertolino
  • 39.
  • Learning to live: when the bird breaks from the cage
  • Opal Moore
  • 40.
  • The stop of truth: In the Night Kitchen
  • Blackballing
  • Paula Fox
  • 41.
  • It's OK If You Don't Love Me: evaluating anticipated experiences of readers
  • Nicholas J. Karolides
  • 42.
  • Johnny Got His Gun: a depression era classic
  • James DeMuth
  • 43.
  • Julie of the Wolves by Jean Craighead George
  • Geneva T. Van Horne
  • John A. Williams
  • 44.
  • Gordon Parks' The Learning Tree: autobiography and education
  • Gilbert Powell Findlay
  • 45.
  • Teaching rationale for William Golding's Lord of the Flies
  • Paul Slayton
  • 46.
  • Shirley Jackson's "The Lottery"
  • Jack Stark
  • 47.
  • 3.
  • Manchild in a world where you just might make it: Claude Brown's Manchild in the Promised Land
  • Sue Bridwell Beckham
  • 48.
  • Reflections on "The Shylock Problem"
  • Gladys V. Veidemanis
  • 49.
  • Supporting traditional values: My Darling, My Hamburger
  • Lee Burress
  • 50.
  • Why Nineteen Eighty-Four should be read and taught
  • Not laughable, but lethal
  • James E. Davis
  • 51.
  • A teachable good book: Of Mice and Men
  • Thomas Scarseth
  • 52.
  • One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich by Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn
  • Frederik Pohl
  • 53.
  • Moby Dick vs. Big Nurse: a feminist defense of a misogynist text: One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest
  • Laura Quinn
  • Norma Fox Mazer
  • 54.
  • Threshold literature: a discussion of Ordinary People
  • Roll Neuhaus
  • 55.
  • In defense of Our Bodies, Ourselves
  • Alleen Pace Nilsen
  • 56.
  • A look inside a landmark: The Outsiders
  • John S. Simmons
  • 57.
  • 4.
  • Is Run, Shelley, Run worth fighting for?
  • Gloria Treadwell Pipkin
  • 58.
  • Penance and repentance in The Scarlet Letter
  • Richard Gappa
  • 59.
  • A rationale for reading John Knowles' A Separate Peace
  • David G. Holborn
  • 60.
  • Authenticity and relevance: Kurt Vonnegut's Slaughterhouse-Five
  • Take the tortillas out of your poetry
  • Peter J. Reed
  • 61.
  • Censoring Judy Blume and Then Again, Maybe I Won't
  • Mel Krutz
  • 62.
  • In defense of To Kill a Mockingbird
  • Jill May
  • 63.
  • Finding humor and value in Where the Sidewalk Ends and A Light in the Attic
  • John M. Kean
  • Introduction
  • Rudolfo A. Anaya
  • 5.
  • White-outs and black-outs on the book shelves
  • Mary Stolz
  • 6.
  • "Shut not your doors": an author looks at censorship
  • Lee Bennett Hopkins
  • II.
  • Challenging books
  • 7.
  • Lee Burress, Nicholas J. Karolides and John M. Kean
  • A rationale for teaching Huckleberry Finn
  • John M. Kean
  • 8.
  • The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn: review of historical challenges
  • Arlene Harris Mitchell
  • 9.
  • Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl
  • Katherine Paterson
  • 10.
  • Annie on My Mind by Nancy Garden
  • Prologue:
  • William Sleator
  • 11.
  • In defense of: Are You There God? It's Me, Margaret, Deenie, and Blubber--three novels by Judy Blume
  • Robin F. Brancato
  • 12.
  • The Bible: source of great literature and controversy
  • Edward B. Jenkinson
  • 13.
  • The Bible and the Constitution
  • Robert M. O'Neil
  • How to be obscene
  • 14.
  • Black Boy (American Hunger): freedom to remember
  • Maryemma Graham and Jerry W. Ward Jr.
  • 15.
  • Black Like Me: in defense of a racial reality
  • Walter C. Farrell, Jr.
  • 16.
  • Bless the Beasts and Children by Glendon Swarthout
  • Sue Ellen Bridgers
  • 17.
  • Upton Sinclair
  • The relevance of Brave New World
  • Robert M. Adams
  • 18.
  • Huxley's Brave New World as social irritant: ban it or buy it?
  • Richard H. Beckham
  • 19.
  • "Alas, alas, that ever love was sin!": marriages moral and immoral in Chaucer
  • Margaret Odegard
  • 20.
  • If you want to know the truth... : The Catcher in the Rye
  • I.
  • Norbert Blei
  • 21.
  • Fighting words in and over Catch-22
  • Marshall Toman
  • 22.
  • "They tell you to do your own thing, but they don't mean it.": censorship and The Chocolate War
  • Zibby Oneal
  • 23.
  • Anthony Burgess's A Clockwork Orange
  • Douglas A. Pearson, Jr.
  • Perspectives: censorship by omission and commission
  • 24.
  • She's just too womanish for them: Alice Walker and The Color Purple
  • Angelene Jamison-Hall
  • 25.
  • Fueling the fire of hell: a reply to censors of The Crucible
  • Joan DelFattore
  • 26.
  • Death of a Salesman: an American classic
  • Harry Harder
  • 27.
  • 1.
  • The debate in literary consciousness: Dickey's Deliverance
  • Robert Beck
  • 28.
  • "Messing up the minds of the citizenry en route": essential questions of value in The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test
  • Terry Beck
  • 29.
  • A Farewell to Arms
  • James A. Michener
  • 30.
  • A defense of A Farewell to Arms
Control code
ocm27430018
Dimensions
23 cm
Extent
xxvi, 498 pages
Isbn
9780810826670
Lccn
93000349
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
System control number
  • (Sirsi) o27430018
  • (OCoLC)27430018

Library Locations

    • Waubonsee: Sugar Grove Campus - Todd LibraryBorrow it
      Collins Hall 2nd Floor Waubonsee Community College Route 47 at Waubonsee Drive, Sugar Grove, IL, 60554-9454, US
      41.7974 -88.45785
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